An Observation: Big learning curve between I4 and I5

Questions and comments about the PE Pilot Training Program

An Observation: Big learning curve between I4 and I5

Postby brianshell » Wed Sep 04, 2013 11:58 am

Not a critique or a complaint... just something I noticed as an X-Plane user.......

I've been muddling through the ratings.. Keith has done a really nice job at presenting enough information to make it interesting during the ratings. Still making you do a little brain-work to get through them rather than a "step by step holding your hand". I've actually really enjoyed it.

I was able to (pretty rapidly) move from I1 to I4....... But I've hit a major roadblock going to I5...

As a refresher, I5 is where you start doing SID and STAR transitions. The issue actually is not in understanding SIDs and STARs (I think I get it!) ... the issue is the airplane required to complete the certification. Since it's a very long flight, Keith (correctly, in my opinion) recommends a turbo-prop or a jet. (KBUR to KLAS, 280nm).

All of my cockpit time so far has been in a C172 or a Baron 58, or a Mooney... steam gauges, mostly. I've intentionally avoided the GPS, in fact, because I wanted to learn the CORRECT way to navigate using basic gear. As I've searched the X-Plane world for my "next airplane" so I can start doing these longer flights, I've quickly discovered that there is a massive learning curve associated with the transition. My steam gauges are typically gone.. all of the VOR/DME gauges are glass.. etc. I can't find any "fast" planes for X-Plane that are /A

So before I can really effectively move to I5, it seems I've got to really sit down and learn how to navigate in a glass-cockpit.

I see three possible alternatives:

1) I can find a faster turbo-prop plane that's still /A -- I haven't found one yet for X-Plane, but any pointers would be greatly appreciated!!!

2) I can coordinate with a controller for some time-acceleration between some of the longer routes, effectively simulating a faster plane. (I hate doing this, but..)

3) Maybe the I5 rating could choose two closer airports? (KSNA and KSAN, for example) so that the need to move up to bigger aircraft isn't there.

Thoughts? Maybe I'm being whiney and should just bite the bullet and learn how to fly with a glass cockpit...
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Re: An Observation: Big learning curve between I4 and I5

Postby Keith Smith » Wed Sep 04, 2013 12:22 pm

I see what you're saying. The I5 was designed back in 2005 for another network where jet flights were a lot more common. That's why there are just 3 VFR ratings (for now). This is one of those hangovers, and yes, it's a bit of a long flight for a slow piston. A 200kt steam gauge Baron should be ok, though. While most of the ratings are relatively short, it's not uncommon for real world XC flights to have 3+ hr legs, so you're not doing anything wrong by using a plane that's going to take a while to get there.

That said, the I9 is going to get an overhaul in the relatively near future, and I've had my eye on the I-5, simply because it doesn't really fit the piston flow that the clients of PilotEdge are looking for.

In the mean time, if you'd like a turboprop that's /A, try the JS32 (the plane that's demonstrated in the I-5 video, turboprop edition) or the upcoming Saab 340 (http://forums.x-pilot.com/topic/5643-sa ... -previews/)

You can either give those a try or stick with the Baron and have a slightly longer flight with a plane you already know, either is fine. The goal is to get comfortable with the SIDs themselves, not to push you into a plane you weren't already flying.

And yes, you can coordinate time acceleration if you like.

Note: The reception distance on DAG in X-Plane 10 is such that you won't be able to pick it up at the published changeover point on the VNY9 SID. You can ask to maintain the published heading until receiving, or request a vector from ATC.
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Re: An Observation: Big learning curve between I4 and I5

Postby RonCraighead » Wed Dec 02, 2015 9:34 pm

Right there with ya... I've decided to do it in the Barron myself.

I'll fly dehydrated, as my wife frowns on my Gatoraide bottle urinal method! Seriously though, it's not that bad.

I flew from Vegas to SEE real world in a 100 knot SportCruiser, and that included a jaunt over the Hoover dam. (Why were the tour helis flying so high?).

A little over an hour isn't too bad, as Keith said...

Good luck!
Ron Craighead
VFR and IFR Pilot, High Performance and Complex Endorsement (AT-6 Texan), Tailwheel Endorsement (Cessna 170), Spin Endorsement (Great Lakes) and survived some acro!
FAA Advanced Ground Instructor, Instrument Ground Instructor.
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Re: An Observation: Big learning curve between I4 and I5

Postby mm007.emko » Thu Dec 03, 2015 4:54 am

I've done it in SF34 cruising 230KTAS, it took 1hr 15min gate-to-gate (well, it was a cargo plane, so maybe ramp-to-ramp :) ). No big deal.

The JS32 or Carenado King Airs would be probably as fast (C90 is as fast - 220-240 true max, the B200 can do 270-280). For all of the mentioned aircraft you can file /A flight plan.
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Re: An Observation: Big learning curve between I4 and I5

Postby stealthbob » Thu Dec 03, 2015 5:24 am

I recall doing that one in the EPIC/A...fast plane but can fly slower when required.

The departure is about 80% of the difficulty after that it is mostly scenery watching. I did fail my first attempt, and learned a good lesson about expectation bias. I filed the wrong alt and was corrected on my clearance. When I was eventually cleared to my cruise alt I did not hear what the controller said, nor what I read back...I simply put in the setting that was in my head and blew my restriction.

Every rating provided a valuable lesson, some not even noticed at the time of the flight but paid off in later flights.
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Re: An Observation: Big learning curve between I4 and I5

Postby Flying Penguin » Thu Dec 03, 2015 10:25 am

Well, appreciate it's a bit of a thread necro already, but the FlyJSim 727 is pretty darn fast and entirely steam guages, plus it gives you an excuse to use some really cool old callsigns :lol:
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Re: An Observation: Big learning curve between I4 and I5

Postby mm007.emko » Sat Dec 05, 2015 2:03 am

Yes, but make sure to choose US one. Couple of months ago I connected as "Cargolux" ("lux" = "daylight" or "life" in Latin). Cool callsign I thought.

When controller called me "charlie-lima-xray [number]" and asked me what my callsign was, I realized that this airline isn't that well known across the Big Pond. :lol:
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Re: An Observation: Big learning curve between I4 and I5

Postby Keith Smith » Tue Dec 08, 2015 9:38 am

You can use any air carrier callsign, but the controllers don't have a list readily in front of them, so if it's one that isn't well known in the US, the controllers are going to ask you what the radio telephony callsign is for the identifier if they can't pick it up clearly when you first call them. A simple remedy is to include the air carrier name in the remarks of the flight plan. You don't have to avoid using Cargolux.
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